Listen Smart – Safely Handling the Power of Sound

CC image dogs in party hats by Karen Arnold at Public Domain PicturesCan You Hear This?

Listen Smart – Safely Handling the Power of Sound

    • Hearing loss can happen to anyone
    • Hearing loss can happen at anytime
    • Once the hearing loss is there, it’s irreversible
    • 1 of out 12 30-Year Olds have hearing impairment
    • As you lose your ear hairs, your hearing will slowly deteriorate
    • You have a ringing in your ear and have a headache afterwards, you may have a noise hangover
    • You can use earplugs to prevent hearing loss
    • You can get $1.99 foam earplugs from the drugstore

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Concert Halls and Theater

  • Musicians are exposed to high levels of noise
  • Live music can cause hearing damage
  • Brass instruments can cause problems for other members of the orchestra/band
  • Piccolos can also be damaging since it’s so close to the player’s ear
  • Actors/other workers on stage can be exposed to high levels of noise caused by on-stage bands and choruses
  • Review noise control regularly
  • Length of exposure is just as important as noise level

 

  • Amplified Live Music

  • In the live event industry, many workers suffer with permanent noise-induced hearing damage
  • protecting your own hearing and that of your employees and colleagues can help prevent a premature end to a career in the live music industry and prevent permanent noise-induced hearing damage
  • You can reduce noise risk by reducing unnecessary exposure and have sound checks
  • Ensure that performers and crew understand why they need to follow instructions on control measures. Provide additional training or team talks if necessary
  • Ensure that those who need hearing protection have them and is using them correctly and consistently
  • Live music can potentially damage your hearing permanently

Studios

  • Musicians and technicians who works in studios are often exposed to high levels of noise at work
  • Duration of exposure is as important as level of noise
  • Some instruments, particularly brass and percussion can cause high sound levels
  • Amplified sound can easily reach dangerous levels
  • You can help reduce exposure to noises by reducing monitor speaker levels
  • Ensure that musicians and technicians understand why they need to follow instructions on control measures. Provide additional training if necessary. Regular meetings will help
  • Ensure that those who need to use hearing protection are doing so correctly and consistently

    Schools and Colleges

  • Teachers of music are often exposed to high levels of noise at work
  • Teachers of music have a responsibility to make noise awareness part of a complete musical education
  • Students are not covered by the regulations, but they are protected by other legislation
  • Length of exposure is as important as noise level
  • Highly reverberant rooms should be avoided. Choose the largest room for the loudest instrument
  • Allow a minimum of two square meters of space for each performer
  • Ensure that teachers understand why they need to follow instructions on control measures. Provide additional training if necessary

Pubs & Clubs

  • People who work or perform in pubs or clubs where amplified music is played are likely to experience high noise levels
  • Regular exposure to high levels of noise can cause permanent hearing damage
  • Employers and employees working in pubs and clubs have responsibilities to protect the hearing of all employees. This includes bar staff, performers and crew, including guest performers
  • Point the sound where you want it – the dance floor or performance area, and away from bars and other areas
  • reduce the length of time to which individuals are exposed
  • Ensure that employers and contractors understand why they need to follow instructions on control measures and ensure the controls are effective. Provide additional training or team talks if necessary
  • Ensure that those who need to use hearing protection are doing so correctly and consistently

Marching Band

  • Marching band members are exposed to high levels of noise at work
  • Some players, particularly percussionists, are often exposed to very high levels of peak sound pressure
  • Regular exposure to high levels of noise can cause permanent hearing damage
  • Employers of those taking part in ceremonial parades and band displays have a duty to protect the hearing of all their employees
  • You can control, reduce and monitor exposure to noise
  • Wherever possible, reduce the volume at which instruments are played
  • Consider the need for hearing protection where noise levels cannot be reduced by other means

Freelancer

  • Ensure that their daily exposure to noise does not exceed 85 dB or wear hearing protection
  • It is important that freelancers protect themselves from hearing damage and undertake hearing health surveillance
  • You are advised whenever undertaking freelance work, to ensure clarification of the responsibilities under the Noise Regulations and to ensure that any risks are controlled – this is best established by the contract of engagement

Chart of Sound in the Environment